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RABiD BUNNY FEVER
K.T.K

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Progress on Windows Logon Background Hacking
AND THEN I HOOKED THE MIGHTY OPCODE, AND SMOTE IT TO RUIN WITH INTERRUPTS AND NOTS!
Since my last post, I’ve made some progress in my spare time on working out how the windows logon screen displays the background. I’ve gotten to try out a lot of new tools, since I haven’t done anything like this in over 10 years, and quite frankly, I’m mostly disappointed. All the tools I already had seem to do the job better than anything new I could find (though, granted, I need to learn WinDBG more). So at this point I can debug the dll, while it’s running live in Windows, via the following process:
  1. Run the Windows Terminal Services hack (WinXP version explanation) so you can have multiple desktops running at once on the virtual machine, which makes things a little easier, but is not necessary.
  2. Make a backup of C:\Windows\System32\LogonUI.exe and made it editable (see previous post for risks and further info).
  3. Add an INT3 interrupt breakpoint near the beginning of LogonUI.exe. I just changed the first conditional jump in the dll startup code that is supposed to fail to an INT3, padded with NOPs.
  4. Set OllyDbg as the JIT debugger, so whenever LoginUI.exe is run and hits the interrupt, it automatically spawns OllyDbg and is attached.
  5. Tell windows to lock itself (Start>Shut Down>Lock [if available] or Win+L).
  6. As soon as OllyDbg is spawned with LoginUI.exe attached, also attach winlogon.exe in another debugger and keep it paused so it doesn’t keep trying to respawn LoginUI.exe when your attached copy doesn’t respond.

It would be nice if I could find an [easy] way to make a spawned process automatically go into my debugger without the need to add an interrupt, especially to a remote debugger, but oh well.

So my plan of action after this is to:
  1. Get the handle or memory location of where the image is stored by monitoring the GDI calls made after the text reference to C:\Windows\System32\oobe\info\backgrounds\backgroundDefault.jpg .
  2. Put a hardware breakpoint on that memory location/handle and find where it is used to draw to the screen background.
  3. At that point, the GDI call could be manipulated to not shrink the image to the primary monitor (easy), or multiple GDI calls could be made to each monitor for all the images (much harder).
The image might actually be shrunk before it is stored in memory too, though from what I’ve gleamed from the disassembly so far, I do not believe this to be the case.

More to come if and when I make progress.
Overcoming the 250KB Windows Login Background Cap

I had the need this year to upgrade to a 6+1 monitor setup for some of the work I’ve been doing.

Home Office 1

Home Office 2

It took me a bit to get everything how I wanted, using Display Fusion for multi monitor control, and a customized version of Window Manager for organizing window positioning. I am very happy with the final result.

However, there was one minor annoyance I decided to tackle as a fun get-back-into-reverse-engineering project (it’s been years since I’ve done any real fun programming, which saddens me greatly). When in the lock/logon screen for Windows 7, only one monitor can show a background, and that background must be limited to a filesize of 250KB, which can greatly reduce the quality of the image.

The C:\Windows\System32\authui.dll controls the lock screen behavior, so it is to this file I looked to for the solutions. Before I go on, there are 2 very important notes I should make:

  1. It can be very dangerous to modify system DLLs. This could crash your operating system, or even make it not able to load! Always backup the files you are modifying first, and make sure you are comfortable with restoring them somehow (most likely using a separate operating system like a Linux Boot CD).
  2. You need to make sure you are actually editing the right file when you open it up. While the file you want will always be in c:\Windows\System32, on 64-bit windows machines there is also a directory at c:\Windows\SysWOW64 that contains a 32-bit version of the file. (Brilliant naming scheme Microsoft! 32 bit files in the “64” directory and vice versa). Depending on the software you are using, sometimes when you try to access the authui.dll in the System32 directory (~1.84MB), it actually modifies the file in SysWOW64 (~1.71MB) using obfuscated Windows magic.

After a little bit of playing, so far I’ve solved the 250KB size limitation, and I plan on continuing to tinker with it a bit more until the other is solved too. To start, you will need to give yourself file system access to modify the c:\Windows\System32\authui.dll file. To do so, go into the file’s property page, change the owner to yourself, and then give appropriate user permissions so you can modify it as you see fit.

Open the authui.dll in your favorite hex editor and replace:
41 B9 00 E8 03 00
with
41 B9 FF FF FF 00
this essentially changes the size cap to ~16MB. However, I haven’t tested anything larger than 280KB yet. There is possibly a size limitation somewhere that may be dangerous to breech, but from what I gleam from the code; I do not think this is the case.

What this change actually does is update the 256,000 value to (2^24)-1 in the following code:
jmp __imp_GetFileSize
41 B9 00 E8 03 00mov r9d, 3E800h
41 3B C1cmp eax, r9d
jnb short loc_xxx

It’s been a bit tedious working on the assembly code of the authui.dll, as my favorite disassembler/debugger (ollydbg) does not work with 64-bit files, and I am not very comfortable with other dissasemblers I have tried. :-\ Alas. Hopefully more coming soon on this topic.